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Objectivism

1.            Formalism

2.            New Criticism

3.            Structuralism

4.            Post-Structuralism

5.            Deconstruction

Subjectivism

    Psychological Criticism

1.                 Freudian criticism

2.                 Lacanian criticism

3.                 Jungian criticism

4.                 Phenomenological Criticism

5.                Reader-Response Criticism

     Historical Criticism

1.              Sociological

2.               Marxist                                            All are found on the Historical Crit. Page [above]

3.               Feminist

4.               New Historicism

 

Critical Lens #1:

 

"The best literature may entertain readers or disturb them, but above all, it must make them think."

Guidelines

· Provide a valid interpretation of the critical lens that clearly establishes the criteria for analysis.
· Indicate whether you agree or disagree with the statement as you have interpreted it.
· Use the criteria suggested by the critical lens to analyze the works you have read.
· Do not summarize the plot but use specific references to appropriate literary elements (for example, theme,   characterization, structure, language, point of view) to develop your analysis.
· Organize your ideas in a logical and coherent manner.·

Critical Lens #2:

 

"To be truly memorable, a book must have at its core one of life's great quests: the quest for love, truth, or power."

Guidelines:

· Provide a valid interpretation of the critical lens that clearly establishes the criteria for analysis.
· Indicate whether you agree or disagree with the statement as you have interpreted it.
· Use the criteria suggested by the critical lens to analyze the works you have read.
· Do not summarize the plot but use specific references to appropriate literary elements (for example, theme,   characterization, structure, language, point of view) to develop your analysis.
· Organize your ideas in a logical and coherent manner.

Critical Lens #3:

 

"A great book should leave you with many experiences, and slightly exhausted at the end." William Styron

Guidelines:

· Provide a valid interpretation of the critical lens that clearly establishes the criteria for analysis.
· Indicate whether you agree or disagree with the statement as you have interpreted it.
· Use the criteria suggested by the critical lens to analyze the works you have read.
· Do not summarize the plot but use specific references to appropriate literary elements (for example, theme,   characterization, structure, language, point of view) to develop your analysis.
· Organize your ideas in a logical and coherent manner.

Critical Lens #4:

 

"The only worthwhile literature is that which makes you think about your own life."

Guidelines:

· Provide a valid interpretation of the critical lens that clearly establishes the criteria for analysis.
· Indicate whether you agree or disagree with the statement as you have interpreted it.
· Use the criteria suggested by the critical lens to analyze the works you have read.
· Do not summarize the plot but use specific references to appropriate literary elements (for example, theme,   characterization, structure, language, point of view) to develop your analysis.
· Organize your ideas in a logical and coherent manner.

5. Feminist literary criticism

Feminist literary criticism helps us look at literature in a different light. It applies the philosophies and perspectives of feminism to the literature we read. There are many different kinds of feminist literary theory. Some theorists examine the language and symbols that are used and how that language and use of symbols is “gendered.” Others remind us that men and women write differently and analyze at how the gender of the author affects how literature is written. Many feminist critics look at how the characters, especially the female characters, are portrayed and ask us to consider how the portrayal of female characters “reinforces or undermines “ sexual stereotypes (Lynn, 1998). Feminist literary theory also suggests that the gender of the reader often affects our response to a text. For example, feminist critics may claim that certain male writers address their readers as if they were all men and exclude the female reader.

Like feminism itself, feminist literary theory asks us to consider the relationships between men and women and their relative roles in society. Much feminist literary theory reminds us that the relationship between men and women in society is often unequal and reflects a particular patriarchal ideology. Those unequal relationships may appear in a variety of ways in the production of literature and within literary texts. Feminist theorists invites us to pay particular attention to the patterns of thought, behavior, values, and power in those relationships.

Feminist literary critics remind us that literary values, conventions, and even the production of literature, have themselves been historically shaped by men. They invite us to consider writings by women , both new and forgotten, and also ask us to consider viewing familiar literature through a feminist perspective.

How do we apply the feminist lens?

We apply it by closely examining the portrayal of the characters, both female and male, the language of the text, the attitude of the author, and the relationship between the characters. We also consider the comments the author seems to be making about society as a whole.

 

 6. Mythological / Archetypal / Symbolic

Note: "Symbolic" approaches may also fall under the category of formalism because they involve a close reading of the text. Myth criticism generally has broader, more universal applications than symbolic criticism, although both assume that certain images have a fairly universal affect on readers.

Definition:

A mythological / archetypal approach to literature assumes that there is a collection of symbols, images, characters, and motifs (i.e. archetypes) that evokes basically the same response in all people.   According to the psychologist Carl Jung, mankind possesses a "collective unconscious" that contains these archetypes and that is common to all of humanity.  Myth critics identify these archetypal patterns and discuss how they function in the works. They believe that these archetypes are the source of much of literature's power.

Some Archetypes (See A Handbook of Critical Approaches to Literature for a complete list):

·          archetypal women - the Good Mother, the Terrible Mother, and the Soul Mate (such as the Virgin Mary)

·          water - creation, birth-death-resurrection, purification, redemption, fertility, growth

·          garden - paradise (Eden), innocence, fertility

·          desert - spiritual emptiness, death, hopelessness

·          red - blood, sacrifice, passion, disorder

·          green - growth, fertility

·          black - chaos, death, evil

·          serpent - evil, sensuality, mystery, wisdom, destruction

·          seven - perfection

·          shadow, persona, and anima (see psychological criticism)

hero archetype -  The hero is involved in a quest (in which he overcomes obstacles). He experiences initiation (involving a separation, transformation, and return), and finally he serves as a scapegoat, that is, he dies to atone.

 

 7. Reader Response Criticism

Reader response criticism analyzes the reader's role in the production of meaning. It lies at the opposite end of the spectrum from formalistic criticism. In reader response criticism, the text itself has no meaning until it is read by a reader. The reader creates the meaning. This criticism can take into account the strategies employed by the author to elicit a certain response from readers. It denies the possibility that works are universal (i.e. that they will always mean more or less the same thing to readers everywhere). Norman Holland argues that "each reader will impose his or her 'identity theme' on the text, to a large extent recreating that text in the reader's image." Therefore, we can understand someone's reading as a function of personal identity.

 

 8. Psychological Approach

Psychological critics view works through the lens of psychology. They look either at the psychological motivations of the characters or of the authors themselves, although the former is generally considered a more respectable approach. Most frequently, psychological critics apply Freudian psychology to works, but other approaches (such as a Jungian approach) also exist.

Freudian Approach:

A Freudian approach often includes pinpointing the influences of a character's id (the instinctual, pleasure seeking part of the mind), superego (the part of the mind that represses the id's impulses) and the ego (the part of the mind that controls but does not repress the id's impulses, releasing them in a healthy way). Freudian critics like to point out the sexual implications of symbols and imagery, since Freud believed that all human behavior is motivated by sexuality. They tend to see concave images, such as ponds, flowers, cups, and caves as female symbols; whereas objects that are longer than they are wide are usually seen as phallic symbols. Dancing, riding, and flying are associated with sexual pleasure. Water is usually associated with birth, the female principle, the maternal, the womb, and the death wish. Freudian critics occasionally discern the presence of an Oedipus complex (a boy's unconscious rivalry with his father for the love of his mother) in the male characters of certain works, such as Hamlet. They may also refer to Freud's psychology of child development, which includes the oral stage, the anal stage, and the genital stage.

Jungian Approach:

Jung is also an influential force in myth (archetypal) criticism. Psychological critics are generally concerned with his concept of the process of individuation (the process of discovering what makes one different form everyone else). Jung labeled three parts of the self: the shadow, or the darker, unconscious self (usually the villain in literature); the persona, or a man's social personality (usually the hero); and the anima, or a man's "soul image" (usually the heroine).  A neurosis occurs when someone fails to assimilate one of these unconscious components into his conscious and projects it on someone else. The persona must be flexible and be able to balance the components of the psyche.

 

 9. Historical / Biographical Approach:

Historical / Biographical critics see works as the reflection of an author's life and times (or of the characters' life and times). They believe it is necessary to know about the author and the political, economical, and sociological context of his times in order to truly understand his works.

Advantages:

This approach works well for some works--like those of Alexander Pope, John Dryden, and Milton--which are obviously political in nature. One must know Milton was blind, for instance, for "On His Blindness" to have any meaning. And one must know something about the Exclusion Bill Crisis to appreciate John Dryden's "Absalom and Achitophel." It also is necessary to take a historical approach in order to place allusions in their proper classical, political, or biblical background.

Disadvantages:

New Critics refer to the historical / biographical critic's belief that the meaning or value of a work may be determined by the author's intention as "the intentional fallacy."  They believe that this approach tends to reduce art to the level of biography and make it relative (to the times) rather than universal.

N. Foster. Adapted from http://www.wwnorton.com/introlit/wal/historical.htm,

http://www.acad.carleton.edu/curricular/educ/faculty/Appleman/Handouts/RoseGlasses.html , http://www.literatureclassics.com/ancientpaths/litcrit.html#myth. April 9, 2004.